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    • Essay: Heed the nightingale's warning.
      Many birders enjoy playing an imaginary game with one another: "Blindfold me and place me anywhere in the world – I bet I can identify where I am, as long as you let me hear the birds." Our changes to the planet are narrowing those bands – a warning sign for our times. Concluding essay of EHN.org's "Winged Warnings" series.
    • Lakota values soar with the eagles.
      Winged Warnings Part 16. College student Tristan Picotte, born and raised on a Lakota reservation in South Dakota, describes how the feathers of bald eagles have inspired and motivated generations of Native Americans. “Eagle feathers pushed our culture forward to better the people, not just the individual,” he writes. “Oyate kin yanipi kte lo. So that we wil […]
    • Report shows schools vulnerable to toxic exposure.
      Dozens of facilities across the Chicago area store or use toxic chemicals which - if released in an accidental leak or explosion - could directly affect hundreds of thousands of schoolchildren throughout the city and suburbs.
    • California becomes first state to ban plastic bags.
      Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill Tuesday that makes California the first state in the nation to ban single-use plastic bags. "This bill is a step in the right direction – it reduces the torrent of plastic polluting our beaches, parks and even the vast ocean itself," Brown said.
    • Mexican farmers stung twice by toxic spill, hurricane.
      The combination of Mexico’s largest mining spill and heavy rains swelling the chemical-tainted Sonora River are causing losses to almost all cattle ranchers and crop damage in an area the government says accounts for nearly 20 percent of the state economy.
    • China launches media campaign to back genetically modified crops.
      China's government has kicked off a media campaign in support of genetically modified crops, as it battles a wave of negative publicity over a technology it hopes will play a major role in boosting its food security.
    • Neonicotinoid ban hit UK farmers hard.
      Peter Kendall surveys his crop of oilseed rape. At this time of year, he should usually be looking at healthy green shoots, but the leaves are full of holes. The driest September on record has meant a plague of flea beetle. The pest is normally controlled by coating the seeds in a systemic pesticide called neonicotinoid.
    • Obama and Modi announce agreement on US-India efforts to fight global warming.
      The Obama administration has reached an agreement with India on measures intended to accelerate that country’s shift to renewable fuels – steps that officials say will reduce emissions while helping India’s new government extend electricity to all of its citizens.
    • Fracking emissions fall; Texas still king of GHGs.
      Just like last year, Texas is king of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., while Vermont remains the greenest state. But unlike last year, U.S. emissions rose 0.6 percent, according to the latest figures from the federal Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program.
    • Ice gone, 35,000 walruses crowd on land.
      With floating ice sparse in the Chukchi Sea, an estimated 35,000 walruses were found crowded onto a beach near the Northwest Alaska village of Point Lay, according to federal biologists. To environmentalists, the exceptionally large gathering is a warning sign.
    • Cement factories cast pall over village in northern Vietnam.
      Thousands of people from Ha Nam Province have sought relief from the thick factory smoke and omnipresent cement dust that's plagued their community for years, but authorities have failed to act.
    • China’s ‘strictest’ air pollution laws introduced in city.
      Shanghai introduces “China’s strictest air protection law,” with maximum fines of US$81,244 — five times the current level. And this fine itself will be hiked on a daily basis if polluters don’t take action.
    • EPA wins another round on Spruce Mine veto.
      The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday won another round in the long legal saga involving one of the largest mountaintop removal mining permits in West Virginia history.
    • More time requested for tank car upgrades.
      The oil and railroad industries are urging federal regulators to allow them as long as seven years to upgrade existing tank cars that transport highly volatile crude oil, a top oil industry official said Tuesday. The cars have ruptured and spilled oil during collisions, leading to intense fires.
    • Study: Residents near crude plant face health risks.
      Residents who live in a public housing project near the crude oil operations at the Port of Albany face significantly higher risks of cancer and other diseases, despite assurances from state officials the air was safe, according to a study by the University at Albany.
    • Feds unveil cleanup plan for New Mexico nuclear waste dump.
      The U.S. Department of Energy on Tuesday said it's committed to cleaning up and resuming initial operations at the federal government's troubled nuclear waste dump in southeastern New Mexico as early as 2016, work that's expected to cost more than $240 million.
    • Biologists identify pot gardens as salmon threat.
      Water use and other actions by the marijuana industry in the Emerald Triangle of Northern California and Southern Oregon are threatening salmon already in danger of extinction, federal biologists said Tuesday.
    • Ohio grant saves family from dangers of lead.
      With grant assistance from the Ohio Department of Health’s Lead Hazard Control Program, Jennifer Cornell and her husband, William, were able to rid their home of the paint – part of an initiative to prevent the exposure of 8,000 children diagnosed with elevated lead levels in Ohio every year.
    • California governor vetoes groundbreaking antibiotics regulation.
      The governor of California on Tuesday vetoed a first-in-the-nation state law to reduce the use of antibiotics in livestock production and said lawmakers should look for “new and effective ways” to prevent antibiotic overuse.
    • Los Angeles is building an e-Highway.
      The neighboring ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach bring in roughly 40 percent of the goods shipped to the United States. The corridor's high concentration of diesel-truck traffic has created a similarly high concentration of pollution in the surrounding areas. But a new road design project dubbed the e-highway is aiming to reduce and maybe even elimin […]

About us

This weblog is for the discussion of contemporary environmental public health issues – issues that may occur locally, nationally, or internationally. My name is Dr. Raymond W. Thron and I will be one of your hosts for this weblog. Joining me is Dr. Shana Morrell. Additional contributors and authors will be announced as they join. The commentaries reflect the opinions and beliefs of the individual writer. Your hosts will will attempt to ensure that all information posted is credible.

For any commentary, to see comments offered, please click on the commentary title, or on “comments” link at the end of the commentary.

Please note that all links in the commentaries were functional at the time the specific commentary was published. Links, however, do change. If you should encounter a non-functional link, do let me know. I will then try to find the new document location, if possible. Send a note to rwthron@yahoo.com

Thank you.

Raymond W. Thron, Ph.D.
Dr. Thron has had a life long career in environmental public health, having worked for both local and state agencies, the private sector, and currently as a faculty member at Walden University. At Walden University, he helped create and served as the first faculty chair for its doctorate program in public health. For ten years, he served as the director of environmental and occupational health for the State of Minnesota.

Previously he had the opportunity to work in several East European countries helping them regarding public health infrastructure, including environmental and occupational health issues, workforce development, and public health collaborative endeavors. Past academic affiliations include the University of Minnesota, University of St. Thomas (St. Paul, MN), Howard University, and through training provided to faculty at Namibia University, Namibia, and Kenyata University, Kenya.

Shana Morrell, Ph.D., MPH
Dr. Morrell received her MPH and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. She majored in environmental health, specializing in environmental toxicology. She currently is the Academic MPH Program Coordinator with Walden University, in the School of Health Sciences.  She maintains a special interest in global environmental health and environmental and social justice.

Mehrdad M. Javaherian, Ph.D., MPH

 Dr. Javaherian holds degrees in civil/environmental engineering and public health, and a PhD in public health focused on epidemiology. His current research is focused on quantitative assessment of the benefits of sustainable best management practices on carbon dioxide emission reductions, including potential health implications. His past research has included quantitative assessment of the association between the built environment and pedestrian activity, and on mathematical modeling of vapor intrusion to indoor air. Dr. Javaherian also has 19 years of consulting experience in the field of environmental health, including performing site investigations, human health and ecological risk assessments, and design and implementation of in-situ remediation technologies at hazardous waste sites. He is currently involved on research, development, and application of multiple patented green and sustainable technologies focused on generating renewable sources of energy, and achieving unrestricted soil and groundwater cleanup in a sustainable manner.

Nina M. Bell, MPH
Mrs. Bell has more than 20 years of experience in marketing and public relations, most of which encompass the healthcare arena. A resident of Northwestern Pennsylvania, she currently works as the Vice President of Stewardship and Development for The Wesbury Foundation, which supports a Continued Care Retirement Community of 400 aging adults.

In the realm of athletics, Mrs. Bell is a triathlete and completed five Ironman competitions as well as several Olympic and Sprint distance races. In 2000, she was named the ASCInet Ohio State Triathlon Series Age-Group Champion. She has also won her division in several regional races in Northwestern Pennsylvania/Eastern Ohio. In 2007, she was named the Ford Ironman Everyday Hero at Ironman Wisconsin for her work in developing a children’s bicycling program to combat childhood obesity. That program is being developed into a publication that will be used as a model for other communities.

She holds a BA degree in public relations/journalism from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a master’s diploma from the University of London in organizational behavior, and is a Certified Fundraising Executive (CFRE), a credential held by only 5,000 people worldwide. She is currently working toward her MPH and PhD in public health/health promotion and education at Walden University.

Return to the Environmental Public Health Today home posting page.

08 Feb 2010>

One Response

  1. Hello,
    I am a Walden University student, and I was to create a username and post my presentation on this weblog. However, I accidentally created a blog account rather than just obtain the username. I was wondering how exactly I would be able to contribute my presentation on here, or if I would need to create a different account.

    Thanks,

    Abe

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