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    • Essay: If only we listened when politicians were listening to scientists.
      Twenty-five years ago today, New Jersey Gov. Thomas Kean issued an executive order – one of those easily-forgotten proclamations destined to fade before the ink is dry on the signature line – warning of the Garden State's increasing vulnerability to climate-driven storms.
    • Why receipts and greasy fingers shouldn’t mix.
      An order of French fries may be bad for your health in ways that extend well beyond the outsize calorie count. According to a new study by scientists at the University of Missouri, people who used hand sanitizer, touched a cash register receipt and then ate French fries were quickly exposed to high levels of bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical widely used to coat […]
    • A Florida city voted to split the state in two because of concerns over climate change.
      The South Miami City Commission voted 3 to 2 for Florida's 23 southern counties to secede and form a new state named South Florida because of frustration over environmental issues and a lack of concern by state leaders.
    • Asthma complaints increase in wake of East Harlem explosion.
      A nonprofit health group in East Harlem says a sharp increase in referrals to its asthma program in the wake of last spring’s gas explosion in the neighborhood is raising concerns that the blast hurt the respiratory health of some residents.
    • China's coal use falls for first time this century, analysis suggests.
      The amount of coal being burned by China has fallen for the first time this century, according to an analysis. China’s booming coal in the last decade has been the major contributor to the fast-rising carbon emissions that drive climate change, making the first fall a significant moment.
    • Researchers say breathing toxic air in the first two years of life linked to autism.
      Pollution could be a factor in autism, researchers have found. They say children with autism spectrum disorder were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of air toxics during their mothers' pregnancies and the first two years of life.
    • Maryland poultry farms fined for reporting lapses.
      Nearly one in five large Maryland chicken farms has been fined recently, state regulators have disclosed, because the growers failed to file information required annually outlining what they did to keep their flocks' waste from polluting the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.
    • Fracking companies using toxic benzene in drilling.
      Some oil and gas drillers are using benzene, which can cause cancer, in the mix of water and chemicals they shoot underground to free trapped hydrocarbons from shale rock, an environmental watchdog group said Wednesday.
    • Ice loss sends Alaskan temperatures soaring by 7C.
      If you doubt that parts of the planet really are warming, talk to residents of Barrow, the Alaskan town that is the most northerly settlement in the US. In the last 34 years, the average October temperature in Barrow has risen by more than 7°C − an increase that, on its own, makes a mockery of international efforts to prevent global temperatures from rising […]
    • Will coal exports kill the Great Barrier Reef?
      Stretching along the Queensland coast, the Great Barrier Reef is an underwater wonderland home to thousands of different fish and coral species. But it is facing multiple threats – from the crown-of-thorns to extreme weather and increased carbon in the atmosphere. And environmentalists say there's another major threat: coal.
    • Israel’s environmental health shows progress, but has much room for improvement, experts find.
      While Israel may have "an impressive array" of air quality monitoring stations throughout the country, the country's indoor air quality remains largely unregulated and demands more attention, a leading American toxicologist concludes in a new Health Ministry report.
    • Environmental groups ask EPA to study drinking water pollution from Wisconsin dairies.
      Citing a rash of contaminated wells in Kewaunee County, a coalition of environmental groups on Wednesday petitioned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to use its emergency authority to investigate pollution of groundwater from dairy manure.
    • West Virginia chemical maker wary after ‘near-catastrophic’ fracking incident.
      As the Tomblin administration considers a plan to allow natural gas drilling under the Ohio River, a major chemical maker in Marshall County has been fighting a proposal for hydraulic fracturing near its plant, citing a “near-catastrophic” gas-well incident last year that may be linked to geologic conditions beneath the river.
    • DEP revokes water lab’s certification after guilty plea.
      West Virginia regulators have revoked the state certification for a Raleigh County laboratory, following the guilty plea of a lab supervisor who admitted he and other employees falsified coal industry samples so mining operations would appear to be in compliance with water pollution standards.
    • Corporations, advocacy groups spend big on ballot measures.
      Bonnie Marsh is worried that many of her neighbors’ health problems stem from big companies farming genetically modified crops around her in Maui County, Hawaii. So she helped collect enough signatures to put an initiative on the November ballot.
    • Critics of Dow herbicide sue US EPA over approval.
      A coalition of U.S. farmer and environmental groups filed a lawsuit on Wednesday seeking to overturn regulatory approval granted last week for an herbicide developed by Dow AgroSciences.
    • Milk grown in a lab is humane and sustainable. But can it catch on?
      The world's first test-tube hamburger has already been synthesized and cooked at a cost of more than $300,000. Now a pair of young bioengineers in Silicon Valley are trying to produce the first glass of artificial milk, without a cow and with the help of genetically-engineered yeast.
    • What if age is nothing but a mind-set?
      Psychologist Ellen Langer believes that one way to enhance well-being is to use placebos. Placebos aren’t just sugar pills disguised as medicine. Entire fields like psychoneuroimmunology and psychoendocrinology have emerged to investigate the relationship between psychological and physiological processes.
    • Hand sanitizer speeds absorption of BPA from receipts.
      Though BPA in plastics has borne the brunt of public and media attention, it may be the paper that is most worrisome. A new study published today has found that BPA is absorbed more quickly and extensively when people apply hand sanitizers before handling receipts.
    • Controversial chemical may leach into skin from cash receipts.
      Touching cash register receipts can dramatically increase your body's absorption of a potentially dangerous chemical, bisphenol A (BPA), researchers report. The chemical is found in products ranging from plastic water bottles and food-can linings. It is also used as a print developer in thermal paper for airline tickets and store and ATM receipts, accor […]

Why Recyle?

Hello everyone, my name is Tonya Herring and I posed the question, “why recycle” in hopes that by the end of my presentation you will be galvanized to be a part of the solution and contribute your efforts to saving our planet.  This presentation is purposed to educate the country at large to include; private citizens, governments, and organizations on why we should collaboratively endeavor to recycle; and make a difference in global warming, air and water pollution, conservation, and energy preservation.   Also, not only does recycling create a salubrious environment, it is a driver of job creation and economic activity.

Drink to Your Health

This presentation focuses on efforts to increase the participation rate of choosing tap water as the drinking water choice.  This presentation is directed to adults in the general population.

I hope that the information is helpful. If you have any questions, or care to leave a comment, please do so.

Click here to view presentation. Drink to Your Health

Thank you.

Rhonda J Noriega

PUBH 8165-2, Environmental Health

Walden University

Say No to the Plastic Bottle

The purpose of this presentation is to increase your knowledge of the environmental health factors which surround the plastic container used for bottled water.  Most Ivy League schools have already begun the process of banning bottled water on their campuses.  I will share with you some key facts about what bottled water does to our ability to manage plastic waste; how plastic influences the taste of water especially if it gets hot (when plastic heats up it emits toxins into the water); and also talk about some of the myths surrounding tap water not tasting good or being unsafe.

I hope that this information is helpful. If you have any questions or care to leave a comment, please do below. Thank you. Please click here to view the presentation:Say No To the Bottle

Cheryl Lassiter-Edwards, LCSW, PhD Candidate

PUBH 8165-1 Environmental Health

Walden University

Eliminating Food Deserts in Georgia’s Urban Communities.

Eliminating Food Deserts in Georgia’s Urban Communities

Asthma and your premature baby

This presentation focuses on reducing the asthma triggers and attacks which increase hospital admission rates among premature infants. This is an educational tool meant to empower parents of premature infants. The presentation is geared towards the parents of premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit in Chicago who are preparing for taking their infants home.

Please click here to view presentation

Julie Grutzmacher

Walden University

PUBH 6165-2

Environmental Health (PUBH – 8165 – 1) West Nile Virus PPT

West Nile Virus

APP9DoyleR

https://environmentalhealthtoday.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/app9doyler.ppt

Hello, I created this educational PPT in order to update Oklahoma Creek County public health nurses  on some of the latest information and statistics  on West Nile Virus. It is important for public health nurses to have this information as they are in a position to identfy high risk geographical areas for mosquito breeding, educate the public of preventitive measures, and to recommend further resources and health care referrals as needed.

While my targtet audience was Oklahoma  Creek County public health nurses, this updated West Nile Virus information may be utilized for any target audience or individual wanting to know some of the latest West Nile Virus statistics and public health recommendations.

Thank you!

Rebekah Doyle

Walden University

Ph.D. Public Health Student

Meningitis: A Review for Health Care Professionals

Meningitis:  A Review for Health Care Professionals

This presentation focuses on educating and informing health care professionals of community hospitals and clinics on meningitis.  Background information is reviewed and strategies to prevent and address an infection are discussed.  The presentation is directed to physicians, nurses, technicians,  aides, public health professionals, and any other health care providers that have direct or indirect involvement with meningitis.

Please click here to view presentation.  I hope the information is helpful.  If you have any questions, or care to leave a comment, please do so below.  Thank you.

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